Autoimmune Disease Can Damage Skin, Hair & Nails (2022)

November 8, 2018

Autoimmune Disease Can Damage Skin, Hair & Nails (1)

(Video) Vitamin D Reduces Autoimmune Diseases: New Research

According to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, there are more than 50 million Americans living with autoimmune disorders. Sometimes a diagnosis of an autoimmune disease can take several years, especially when the viral-like symptoms are not taken seriously. If you think you are not well, or persistently feel off key, then your body might be telling you something. When autoimmunity is the cause, it is important to not let friends or family members influence your belief that your symptoms are all in your head. Instead, take control of your life and base your medical decisions on how you feel.

The first thing to know about an autoimmune disorder is that something in your immune system went rogue. Researchers believe over eighty disorders are caused by a faulty immune system attack on healthy tissues and organs. Autoimmune diseases can affect almost any part of the body, including the brain, heart, thyroid, pancreas, digestive tract, lungs, joints, blood vessels, lungs, skin, eyes, nerves, muscles or kidneys. Because symptoms of an autoimmune disease can mimic those of other acute illnesses, it is imperative to work with your doctor or dermatologist to determine an official diagnosis early on.

Although the blood cells in the body's immune system are supposed to protect against harmful invaders, faulty autoimmunity results in antibodies attacking healthy cells causing tissue, joint, and organ damage from the resulting inflammatory response. Since there is no way to know everything about autoimmune disorders, the trick is to learn as much about your disease as you can and make crucial changes in how you manage your life. With an accurate diagnosis and the right medical interventions, even those suffering with multiple disorders can live healthier and fuller lives and avoid a life filled with misery and illness.

(Video) This is what happens when you have an autoimmune disease

How Autoimmune Disorders Affect Your Skin and Nails

It might seem silly that a skin disease like psoriasis could be caused by the same dysfunction as multiple sclerosis, but both are autoimmune disorders. Listed below are some of the more common types of autoimmune diseases:

  • Psoriasis - Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that speeds up the growth of skin cells, which results in inflamed patches. Scalp psoriasis often occurs on the forehead but can spread to the hair causing silvery scales. Since skin lesions traditionally precede joint symptoms, your dermatologist is in a unique position to help treat your psoriasis as well as identify psoriatic arthritis before irreversible joint damage occurs. Those who suffer from psoriasis can live a full and active life with the right management strategies to restore skin health.
  • Vitiligo - Vitiligo is a condition in which your skin loses melanin. The autoimmune disease occurs when the cells that produce melanin are destroyed and no longer form the pigment that determines the color of your skin, hair and eyes. It affects all races, but may be more noticeable in those with darker skin, as small areas of pigment loss spread with time. Dermatologic treatments can help slow the progression and restore some color to affected areas of skin. Associates in Dermatology president and medical director, Michael Steppie M.D., recently collaborated with Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute on a vitiligo research study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.
  • Lupus - No two cases of lupus are exactly alike, as symptoms may come on slowly or develop suddenly, however, a butterfly-shaped rash on a person's face that crosses the bridge of the nose and covers both cheeks is a tale-tell symptomatic effect. People with lupus often have excessively thick or rough nail folds and cuticles with spots or hyperpigmentation. Since lupus affects different parts of your life, it is important to work closely with your primary physician and dermatologist to help direct your personalized treatments and care.
  • Alopecia - For unknown reasons, the body's immune system disrupts normal hair formation by mistakenly attacking an enzyme produced by the hair follicles. This damage leads to smooth, roundish patches of hair loss. Some patients have alternating patterns of hair loss followed by spontaneous growth. People's reactions vary but you may simply prefer to let your baldness run its course untreated. Not all alopecia sufferers have nail problems, but it is common for nails to crumble, become spoon-shaped, or have a spotty or red lunula.
  • Autoimmune Arthritis - An early diagnosis of autoimmune arthritis like rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis allows for better treatment options and can help control damaging inflammation to slow the progression of the disease. Rheumatoid nodules are firm lumps typically seen under the skin of the hands, heels and elbows. Nodules can cluster or appear alone and the skin above can become infected or ulcerative. Psoriatic arthritis can affect the feet and toes causing the toenails to thicken and separate from the nail bed.
  • Hashimoto's Disease - According to the Mayo Clinic online, Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of low thyroid-hormone production. The butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck regulates many metabolic activities but reduced hormone production can result in hair loss and a puffy face as well as crumbling, splitting, thinning or spoon-shaped nails. You are more likely to develop Hashimoto's disease if you already have another autoimmune disorder, but overall the disease is eight times more likely to affect women than men.
  • Multiple Sclerosis - Most symptoms of multiple sclerosis are a result of autoimmune damage to the brain, spinal cord and nerves, including skin conditions like tingling, itching, numbness and painful dysesthesia. While there is no sure-fire treatment for the phantom skin sensations, medications, topical creams, and TENS therapy may help you live a more normal life. The sensation of burning pain and sensitivity to touch most often occurs on the skin of the legs but some MS patients also complain of painful numbness in the fingertips and feet.

Unfortunately, symptoms of these puzzling autoimmune disorders do not follow a set pattern. Each condition can be mild, moderate or severe and may or may not affect the same areas of the body. Moreover, you can be affected by one or several autoimmune disorders.

(Video) More Than Skin Deep: Understanding the Impact of Autoimmune Skin Diseases on Women's Health

Managing Autoimmune Conditions to Control Flare Ups

People suffering from symptoms, such as hair loss, rashes and nail deformities often overlook the role of his or her dermatologist in helping to diagnose, treat, and limit the spread of chronic diseases like lupus or psoriatic arthritis. Immune system disorders can happen to anyone at any age. The paradigm of these conditions is that a genetically predisposed person with hormonal imbalances encounters some environmental factor that triggers his or her autoimmunity. Physical and emotional stress may contribute to the development of a disorder. Unfortunately, the disease itself may cause significant stress, which can lead to a vicious cycle.

Once an autoimmune condition is correctly diagnosed, it can usually be managed with a combination of medications, therapies and lifestyle changes to arrest the spread of diseases to other organs. While conventional medicine continues to develop better methods of managing autoimmunity, you can work with your doctor and dermatologist to create a path to better health by focusing on factors that are completely within your control. In the past, medical providers stole medications from other specialties to treat autoimmune diseases. Finally, researchers are working at the cell level to design better treatments that work on the autoimmune conditions that need to be treated.

Although autoimmune diseases cannot be prevented, early recognition and treatment can be crucial for leading a healthier and fuller life. Whether you or a loved one are experiencing uncomfortable skin sensations, hair loss, or damaged nails, the dermatologists at Associates in Dermatology via our 15 locations are here to help. In addition to our clinical and cosmetic dermatology services, our practice is committed to providing unsurpassed Dermatopathology and personalized services to our patients through an "in-house" CAP(College of American Pathologists)or CLIA(Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments)accredited laboratories.

(Video) Cutaneous Lupus - Yale Medicine Explains

(Video) Inflammatory / autoimmune diseases of the skin

FAQs

What autoimmune disease affects hair? ›

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system mistakenly attacks a part of your body. When you have alopecia areata, cells in your immune system surround and attack your hair follicles (the part of your body that makes hair).

What autoimmune disease affects the nails? ›

Nail psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes discoloration, pitting and changes in the structure of your nails. It can make you feel self-conscious, though you can buff your nails and apply nail polish to improve their appearance. Nail psoriasis isn't contagious, and treatments can help your symptoms improve.

What autoimmune disease affects your skin? ›

Autoimmune diseases tend to bring complicated symptoms. Many people with these conditions see doctors in several medical specialties. Lupus and scleroderma are two that primarily affect the skin, requiring dermatology care. But these diseases may also affect connective tissues, which are treated by a rheumatologist.

What are 5 common symptoms of an autoimmune disorder? ›

Common symptoms of autoimmune disease include:
  • Fatigue.
  • Joint pain and swelling.
  • Skin problems.
  • Abdominal pain or digestive issues.
  • Recurring fever.
  • Swollen glands.

How do I stop autoimmune hair loss? ›

Treatment options for alopecia areata include: Corticosteroids: anti-inflammatory drugs that are prescribed for autoimmune diseases. Corticosteroids can be given as an injection into the scalp or other areas, orally (as a pill), or applied topically (rubbed into the skin) as an ointment, cream, or foam.

What inflammatory conditions cause hair loss? ›

Among the autoimmune diseases that can lead to some form of hair loss are:
  • Alopecia areata.
  • Alopecia Universalis.
  • Lupus.
  • Hashimoto's disease.
  • Graves' disease.
  • Crohn's disease.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Psoriasis.
27 Feb 2020

Does lupus affect hair and nails? ›

Unfortunately, yes. Lupus causes widespread inflammation that usually involves your skin — particularly on your face and scalp. Lupus can cause the hair on your scalp to gradually thin out, although a few people lose clumps of hair. Loss of eyebrow, eyelash, beard and body hair also is possible.

Can fingernails show signs of illness? ›

Ripples on nails or pitted nails may be caused by a skin disorder, psoriasis, eczema, or arthritis. Nail clubbing is when a nail curves under at the tip of the finger. It could indicate heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lung disease, liver disease, thyroid disease, or HIV/AIDS.

What are the 5 common nail problems? ›

Tips to treat the 5 most common nail disorders: brittle nails, onycholysis, paronychia, psoriasis, onychomycosis.

How do you stop your immune system from attacking your skin? ›

Use nutrients such as fish oil, vitamin C, vitamin D, and probiotics to help calm your immune response naturally. Exercise regularly — it's a natural anti-inflammatory. Practice deep relaxation like yoga, deep breathing, biofeedback, or massage, because stress worsens the immune response.

What are the 7 autoimmune diseases? ›

Common autoimmune disorders include:
  • Addison disease.
  • Celiac disease - sprue (gluten-sensitive enteropathy)
  • Dermatomyositis.
  • Graves disease.
  • Hashimoto thyroiditis.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Myasthenia gravis.
  • Pernicious anemia.
24 Apr 2021

Can a weak immune system cause skin problems? ›

Your skin goes into damage control mode after you get a burn, cut or scrape. Your body works to protect the wound by sending nutrient-rich blood to the injury to help regenerate new skin. This healing process depends on healthy immune cells. But if your immune system is sluggish, your skin can't regenerate.

How do autoimmune diseases start? ›

On a basic level, autoimmune disease occurs because the body's natural defenses — the immune system — attack the body's own healthy tissue. Researchers have several ideas about why this happens. When the body senses danger from a virus or infection, the immune system kicks into gear and attacks it.

What is the test for autoimmune disease? ›

The antinuclear antibody (ANA) immunofluorescence assay (IFA) is a first-line screening test for patients with a suspected autoimmune disease. This test is the gold standard because of its high sensitivity compared to other assays.

Can autoimmune disease go away? ›

Autoimmune disorders in general cannot be cured, but the condition can be controlled in many cases. Historically, treatments include: anti-inflammatory drugs – to reduce inflammation and pain. corticosteroids – to reduce inflammation.

What lack of vitamin causes hair loss? ›

Only riboflavin, biotin, folate, and vitamin B12 deficiencies have been associated with hair loss.

Are autoimmune diseases genetic? ›

Autoimmune disorders have a complex genetic basis; multiple genes contribute to disease risk, each with generally modest effects independently. In addition, it is now clear that common genes underlie multiple autoimmune disorders.

Can a weak immune system cause hair loss? ›

Healthy and active immune cells ensure hair regeneration, while defective immune cells can impair growth and trigger hair loss. Studies in recent times have shown that the immune system has a role to play in the regeneration of hair follicles.

What autoimmune disease causes joint pain and hair loss? ›

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a type of autoimmune disease. It causes the immune system to mistakenly attacks the joints, causing pain, inflammation, and reduced mobility. In some people, the condition may also lead to hair loss.

What diseases cause hair loss in females? ›

There are a wide range of conditions that can bring on hair loss, with some of the most common being pregnancy, thyroid disorders, and anemia. Others include autoimmune diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and skin conditions such as psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis, Rogers says.

What autoimmune diseases cause scalp pain? ›

Medical causes

Autoimmune: Some autoimmune diseases can cause inflammation of the blood vessels in your head leading to scalp pain. One such condition is called Giant Cell Arteritis, also known as Temporal Arteritis. Dermatologic: Skin conditions such as eczema or dandruff can cause inflammation of the scalp.

What are the top 10 signs of lupus? ›

Top 10 Most Common Lupus Symptoms Include:
  • Achy or swollen joints (arthralgia)
  • Unexplained fever (more than 100° F)
  • Swollen joints (arthritis)
  • Prolonged or extreme fatigue.
  • Skin rash, including a butterfly-shaped rash across the cheeks and nose.
  • Pain in the chest when breathing deeply (pleurisy)
  • Hair loss.

What does skin lupus look like? ›

They can look like a ring with a darker red circle on the ring's outer edge. The skin is red and scaly. These lesions can result from a reaction to certain medications. They appear most often on the neck, chest, upper back, shoulders and arms.

What do fingernails look like with lupus? ›

Lupus Symptom: Nail Changes

Lupus can cause the nails to crack or fall off. They may be discolored with blue or reddish spots at the base. These spots are actually in the nail bed, the result of inflamed small blood vessels. Swelling may also make the skin around the base of the nail look red and puffy.

What diseases can your nails tell you? ›

Changes in Nail Shape

It could indicate heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lung disease, liver disease, thyroid disease, or HIV/AIDS. Puffy redness near the cuticle can indicate inflammation, a bacteria or yeast infection, Lupus, or other connective tissue disease.

Does kidney disease affect your fingernails? ›

Nail changes.

Kidney disease can affect the appearance of your fingernails, toenails, or both. People who have advanced kidney disease can develop: A white color on the upper part of one or more nails and a normal to reddish brown color below, as shown here (half-and-half nails) Pale nails.

What kind of doctor do you see for nail problems? ›

A dermatologist should examine any nail that's lifting up. You may need treatment to clear an infection. A dermatologist can also give you some tips that may help the new nail grow out normally. If you have redness and swelling around a nail, you may have an infection.

Is zinc good for nails and hair? ›

Zinc is an essential nutrient that can contribute to the health of a person's hair, skin, and nails. Zinc deficiency, which may be due to a lack of zinc in the diet or an underlying medical condition, can cause nail dystrophy. Nail dystrophy is the discoloration and distortion of a person's nails.

What are the 6 common nail diseases? ›

Brittle nail syndrome, onychomycosis, paronychia, nail psoriasis, longitudinal melanonychia, Beau's lines, onychomadesis and retronychia are common nail disorders seen in clinical practice.

Who treats autoimmune skin diseases? ›

Treatments. Your dermatologist may prescribe medication to treat the symptoms of your autoimmune skin condition, as well as to treat the underlying cause.

What are the 2 general causes of autoimmune diseases? ›

BOTTOM LINE: Researchers don't know exactly what causes autoimmune diseases. Genetics, diet, infections, and exposure to chemicals might be involved.

How can I test my immune system? ›

Blood tests.

Blood tests can determine if you have typical levels of infection-fighting proteins (immunoglobulins) in your blood and measure the levels of blood cells and immune system cells. Having numbers of certain cells in your blood that are outside of the standard range can indicate an immune system defect.

What are the 3 most common autoimmune diseases? ›

Common ones include lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Autoimmune diseases can affect many types of tissues and nearly any organ in your body.

What are the chances of having 2 autoimmune diseases? ›

Disorders of an autoimmune nature are known to occur with increased frequency in patients with another autoimmune disease. About 25 percent of patients with autoimmune diseases have a tendency to develop additional autoimmune disorders (3).

Do autoimmune diseases run in families? ›

Autoimmune diseases do tend to run in families, which means that certain genes may make some people more likely to develop a problem. Viruses, certain chemicals, and other things in the environment may trigger an autoimmune disease if you already have the genes for it.

What autoimmune diseases affect the face? ›

Rashes on the face

Two autoimmune diseases — lupus and dermatomyositis — have rashes that can affect the face in different ways. Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that most commonly affects women age 15 to 44. There are different types of lupus. Some forms mainly affect the skin, like cutaneous lupus.

What autoimmune causes itching? ›

Some autoimmune diseases that may cause an itchy rash are cutaneous lupus, oral lichen planus, and erythrodermic psoriasis.

How do I know if I have an immune system problem? ›

You Get Sick All the Time

Frequent infections like colds or flu also could be signs of an underactive immune system. If you have four or more yearly ear infections, chronic sinus infections, pneumonia twice in one year, or you need antibiotics twice a year or more often, you could have an immune deficiency.

Do autoimmune diseases show up in blood tests? ›

One blood test for autoimmune disease is C-reactive protein (CRP). Another test is ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) - this is done to assess an inflammation that is not from an infection or due to other reasons. One of the most common blood tests for detecting autoimmune disorders is ANA (antinuclear antibodies).

Can autoimmune disease be caused by stress? ›

Physical and psychological stress has been implicated in the development of autoimmune disease, since numerous animal and human studies demonstrated the effect of sundry stressors on immune function.

How do you prevent autoimmune diseases? ›

Some ideas to start with are meditation, yoga, tai chi, gentle walks, keeping a journal or starting a new hobby. There is no guaranteed way to prevent an autoimmune disease from developing. But, by taking small steps to support your immune system, you can reduce your risk of autoimmunity.

How long can you live with autoimmune disease? ›

In the large majority of cases, autoimmune diseases are not fatal, and those living with an autoimmune disease can expect to live a regular lifespan.

What autoimmune disease causes neck pain? ›

What is myositis? Myositis is an autoimmune disease involving chronic inflammation that leads to the weakening of muscles over time, particularly those in the neck, shoulders, hips and back. It may be painful, too. The muscle inflammation is from the immune system losing tolerance of the muscle.

Why are autoimmune diseases more common now? ›

More and more people around the world are suffering because their immune systems can no longer tell the difference between healthy cells and invading micro-organisms. Disease defences that once protected them are instead attacking their tissue and organs.

Can vitamin D reverse autoimmune disease? ›

In a new study, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found the people who took vitamin D, or vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids, had a significantly lower rate of autoimmune diseases — such as rheumatoid arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, autoimmune thyroid disease, and psoriasis — than people who took a ...

Do autoimmune diseases get worse with age? ›

Older persons have higher autoimmunity but a lower prevalence of autoimmune diseases. A possible explanation for this is the expansion of many protective regulatory mechanisms highly characteristic in the elderly. Of note is the higher production of peripheral T-regulatory cells.

What autoimmune disease is more common in females? ›

Autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and Sjogren's syndrome are hypothesized to occur more in women due to the hormonal changes women experience. Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by painful, swollen, stiff joints, often accompanied by fever, fatigue, and weightless.

Is hair loss related to autoimmune disease? ›

Some autoimmune disorders can be particularly associated with hair loss such as, alopecia, lupus, Hashimoto's, psoriasis, and Crohn's Disease/ulcerative colitis. Some medications to treat the autoimmune disease can lead to hair loss. It is not entirely clear why some biologics affect hair.

What diseases cause hair loss in females? ›

There are a wide range of conditions that can bring on hair loss, with some of the most common being pregnancy, thyroid disorders, and anemia. Others include autoimmune diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and skin conditions such as psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis, Rogers says.

What autoimmune disease causes hair loss and joint pain? ›

Rheumatoid arthritis and hair loss: What is the link? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a type of autoimmune disease. It causes the immune system to mistakenly attacks the joints, causing pain, inflammation, and reduced mobility. In some people, the condition may also lead to hair loss.

Can a positive ANA cause hair loss? ›

Clinical features that can emerge include but are not limited to fever, chills, joint swelling, nasal/oral ulcers, hair loss, severe dry eyes/dry mouth, and kidney disease. By itself, a positive ANA does not in any way mean you have an autoimmune disease or need treatment.

What causes an autoimmune disease? ›

On a basic level, autoimmune disease occurs because the body's natural defenses — the immune system — attack the body's own healthy tissue. Researchers have several ideas about why this happens. When the body senses danger from a virus or infection, the immune system kicks into gear and attacks it.

What lack of vitamin causes hair loss? ›

Only riboflavin, biotin, folate, and vitamin B12 deficiencies have been associated with hair loss.

What vitamin should I take for hair loss? ›

Biotin. Biotin (vitamin B7) is important for cells inside your body. Low levels of it can cause hair loss, skin rashes, and brittle nails.

Which food is good for hair thickness? ›

Lean meats like fish and chicken, eggs, and soy products are good sources. Eat one serving every day. Because trace minerals like iron, magnesium, zinc, and biotin also affect hair, it's a good idea to take a daily multivitamin. The right foods can be really good for your 'do, but hair loss has many causes.

What medications cause hairloss? ›

Many different types of drugs are thought to cause hair loss, including: Acne medications containing vitamin A (retinoids)
...
Chemotherapy drugs that tend to cause hair loss include:
  • adriamycin.
  • cyclophosphamide.
  • dactinomycin.
  • daunorubicin.
  • docetaxel.
  • doxorubicin.
  • etoposide.
  • fluorouracil.
12 Jul 2022

What is the most common autoimmune disease? ›

The most common autoimmune disorders in the United States are Crohn's disease, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, celiac disease, and psoriasis. Read more from AARP.

What autoimmune disease causes neck pain? ›

What is myositis? Myositis is an autoimmune disease involving chronic inflammation that leads to the weakening of muscles over time, particularly those in the neck, shoulders, hips and back. It may be painful, too. The muscle inflammation is from the immune system losing tolerance of the muscle.

Are autoimmune diseases genetic? ›

Autoimmune disorders have a complex genetic basis; multiple genes contribute to disease risk, each with generally modest effects independently. In addition, it is now clear that common genes underlie multiple autoimmune disorders.

Is a positive ANA test serious? ›

Results. The presence of antinuclear antibodies is a positive test result. But having a positive result doesn't mean you have a disease. Many people with no disease have positive ANA tests — particularly women older than 65.

What cancers cause positive ANA? ›

Neoplastic diseases may cause positive ANA. Some authors have described that ANA is found in the sera from lung, breast, head and neck cancer patients as frequently as in RA and SLE 3, 4, 5. Chapman et al. 6 has suggested that in breast cancer they may be used as an aid to early diagnosis.

What diseases cause positive ANA? ›

Conditions that usually cause a positive ANA test include:
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus.
  • Sjögren's syndrome -- a disease that causes dry eyes and mouth.
  • Scleroderma -- a connective tissue disease.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis -- this causes joint damage, pain, and swelling.
  • Polymyositis -- a disease that causes muscle weakness.
2 Sept 2022

Videos

1. How Iron Affects Your Hair, Skin and Nails
(Dr. Eric Berg DC)
2. 9 Autoimmune Diseases that causes Hair Loss
(Finding Remedies)
3. Diet That Tackles Symptoms of Autoimmune Diseases
(The Doctors)
4. Mold + Reversing Auto Immune Disease With Dr. Ann Shippy
(GLOW by Marlowe)
5. Hair, Skin & Nails | Melissa Piliang, MD
(Cleveland Clinic)
6. 5 Things Your Nails Can Say About Your Health
(SciShow)

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Francesca Jacobs Ret

Last Updated: 07/13/2022

Views: 6478

Rating: 4.8 / 5 (48 voted)

Reviews: 87% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Francesca Jacobs Ret

Birthday: 1996-12-09

Address: Apt. 141 1406 Mitch Summit, New Teganshire, UT 82655-0699

Phone: +2296092334654

Job: Technology Architect

Hobby: Snowboarding, Scouting, Foreign language learning, Dowsing, Baton twirling, Sculpting, Cabaret

Introduction: My name is Francesca Jacobs Ret, I am a innocent, super, beautiful, charming, lucky, gentle, clever person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.